Back to the main page

Mailing List Logs for ShadowRN

Message no. 1
From: jhubert@***.de (JÃŒrgen_Hubert)
Subject: German versus English SR books
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 08:20:25 +0200
Here is a comment from a recent thread over at ENWorld:

"I'm not sure what input you see in SR3 from FanPro, but from what I gather
most of the Germany sourcebooks were so off kilter, they would never see the
light of day. The one Germany sourcebook that did make US release was
substantially altered from what I gather.

But, I think that's been my point all along. The European/German/FanPro feel
of the game is different from the SR1 & SR2 feel. It's a different outlook,
and it shows quite strongly in FanPro's SR3 stuff. It no longer feels like
the Cyberpunk Shadowrunner Hero game, but more like Grand Theft Auto:
Shadowrun."

You can see the whole thread here:

http://www.enworld.org/showthread.php?t4770&page=1&pp@;

Now, I've bought "Deutschland in den Schatten II", but since it is one huge
volume, it has been sitting on my shelf for more than a year while I was
reading shorter, more easily digestible books. So now I was wondering: Do
you think this statement is true? Do the German-language SR books differ
radically in style from their American counterparts?


- Jürgen Hubert

Urbis - A World of Cities
Homepage: http://juergen.the-huberts.net/dnd/urbis/index.html
Developer's Journal: http://www.livejournal.com/community/worldofcities/
Message no. 2
From: gurth@******.nl (Gurth)
Subject: German versus English SR books
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 11:31:37 +0200
According to Jürgen Hubert, on 28-03-2005 08:20 the word on the street
was...

> But, I think that's been my point all along. The European/German/FanPro
> feel of the game is different from the SR1 & SR2 feel. It's a different
> outlook, and it shows quite strongly in FanPro's SR3 stuff. It no longer
> feels like the Cyberpunk Shadowrunner Hero game, but more like Grand
> Theft Auto: Shadowrun."

Meaning that SR3 feels like a game where you play criminals, while SR1/2
felt like playing the cinematic hero? IMHO, it's exactly the other way
around -- in my group, the PCs are basically a bunch of criminals doing
whatever they do because it's in their own best interest -- not because
it would help Save the World(tm) or anything.

> You can see the whole thread here:
>
> http://www.enworld.org/showthread.php?t4770&page=1&pp@;

I quit about halfway through the first page, I don't think I could take
6 1/2 more of "SR should go d20!" "That'd kill it!" "No, it
wouldn't!"

> Now, I've bought "Deutschland in den Schatten II", but since it is one
> huge volume

I wanted to buy it for the last couple of years at Spiel, but always
found better things to spend my money on there :)

> Do the German-language
> SR books differ radically in style from their American counterparts?

I'm not sure... I have the original German SR books released before
DidS2, and my impression mostly was that they tried to make Germany like
Seattle/the UCAS, only "more so" in a misguided belief that that would
make the place appeal to players/runners. But radically different? I'm
not sure.

--
Gurth@******.nl - Stone Age: http://www.xs4all.nl/~gurth/index.html
Kemen (keemde, h gekeemd): het spelen van computerspelletjes
-> Possibly NAGEE Editor & ShadowRN GridSec * Triangle Virtuoso <-
-> The Plastic Warriors Site: http://plastic.dumpshock.com <-

GC3.12: GAT/! d- s:- !a>? C++(---) UL+ P(+) L++ E W--(++) N o? K w(--)
O V? PS+ PE@ Y PGP- t- 5++ X(+) R+++$ tv+(++) b++@ DI- D+ G+ e h! !r y?
Incubated into the First Church of the Sqooshy Ball, 21-05-1998
Message no. 3
From: Arkane@********.de (Thomas_FaÃčnacht)
Subject: German versus English SR books
Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 12:04:39 +0200
Jürgen Hubert wrote:

> Here is a comment from a recent thread over at ENWorld:
>
> "I'm not sure what input you see in SR3 from FanPro, but from what I
> gather most of the Germany sourcebooks were so off kilter, they would
> never see the light of day. The one Germany sourcebook that did make
> US release was substantially altered from what I gather.

The english "Germany in the Shadows" was (as far as I know) a exact copy
of the german one - without the horrible overpowered weapons and stuff...

>
> But, I think that's been my point all along. The
> European/German/FanPro feel of the game is different from the SR1 &
> SR2 feel. It's a different outlook, and it shows quite strongly in
> FanPro's SR3 stuff. It no longer feels like the Cyberpunk Shadowrunner
> Hero game, but more like Grand Theft Auto: Shadowrun."

Fanpro made some books more "SHADOWRUN" than the original ones - the
german "Man & Machine" and the "Cannon Companion" had Shadowtalk
and/or
pictures from the community.

>
> You can see the whole thread here:
>
> http://www.enworld.org/showthread.php?t4770&page=1&pp@;
>
> Now, I've bought "Deutschland in den Schatten II", but since it is one
> huge volume, it has been sitting on my shelf for more than a year
> while I was reading shorter, more easily digestible books. So now I
> was wondering: Do you think this statement is true? Do the
> German-language SR books differ radically in style from their American
> counterparts?

Fanpro had their his phase of "Bigger! Better! Weirder!" (= the first
three Books about Germany, Swiss and Austria ad the adventure "... and
Dioxin", then they had their phase of "We hear the input of the
community" (Rigger III, M&M, CC), now they are back to "We translate the
english books and append some background info (and some ┤normal┤ rules /
stuff) for Germany".

>
>
> - Jürgen Hubert
>
>
Arkane

PS. Sorry for bad grammar and bad spelling.

Further Reading

If you enjoyed reading about German versus English SR books, you may also be interested in:

Disclaimer

These messages were posted a long time ago on a mailing list far, far away. The copyright to their contents probably lies with the original authors of the individual messages, but since they were published in an electronic forum that anyone could subscribe to, and the logs were available to subscribers and most likely non-subscribers as well, it's felt that re-publishing them here is a kind of public service.